Kansas City Royals 2020 Top 50 Prospects

Jackson Kowar. Photo credit - Ryan Griffith, @ryangriffith on Twitter

Once a bottom of the barrel farm system, things are looking much brighter among the ranks of the Kansas City Royals organization as we get started in 2020. After drafting a whole new crop of college pitchers during the 2018 MLB Draft, the Royals went out and got two, young, sky-is-the-limit type shortstops in 2019 to give the farm system a balance of stability and limitless potential.

This marks my very first article for Prospects1500, so lists you’ve seen here in the past may look a bit different than the list you’ll get today. I think this is a great thing for the site, because you’ve been given multiple different looks at this system before and now you’ll get a new look with me. Never a bad thing to diversify the opinions from which you gather your intel.


As we get into the rankings, here’s a quick breakdown of how the “Tier” system works here at Prospects1500:

Tier 1: Players with high expectations of both making the majors and playing at an All-Star level for a number of years
Tier 2: Players with an above average expectation of making the majors and being a solid contributor
Tier 3: Players with an average expectation of making the majors and being a solid contributor
Tier 4: Players who have the potential of making the majors, or have high likelihood of making the majors but providing minimal impact
Tier 5: Players who are worth keeping an eye on, but likely to never make a team’s 40-man roster.

I always like to make something clear when writing up prospect lists: these are supposed to be fun. It is my opinion and my opinion only. It is not gospel and it doesn’t impact the real world – not one bit. I genuinely hope you enjoy reading my thoughts on some of the top guys in the Royals system, and I look forward to hearing your thoughts on Twitter as well (@Prospects1500, @RoyalsFarm, or @duvy_013). With that said, let’s get after it.


Tier 1

1. Bobby Witt Jr., SS
Age: 19
Highest level in 2019: Rookie (Arizona League)

There’s a bit of risk involved with Bobby Witt Jr. as it pertains to his hit tool, but he checks literally every other box you could want in a prospect. He’s an elite defender at SS, he’s got a great arm, he can run, his raw power is undeniable, his dad is a former number three overall pick. What else could you want from a kid? Witt had a most memorable 2019 that saw him win two Gatorade Player of the Year awards and a Texas State Championship on his way to being the number two overall pick in June. Forget his performance in the Arizona League, because we’ll get a good look at the real Bobby Witt Jr. this year at Low-A. ETA: 2022


Tier 2

2. Jackson Kowar, RHP
Age: 23
Highest level in 2019: AA (Northwest Arkansas)

Normally you wouldn’t expect a pitcher to go from High-A to AA, regarded as one of the most difficult jumps in all of baseball, and get better in every single category possible. That is exactly what Jackson Kowar did though. He went from one of Minor League Baseball’s best pitching environments, pitching in the Carolina League, to one of baseball’s better offensive environments in the Texas League, and got better in almost every single way possible. The strikeouts went up, the walks went down, the ground balls went up, the ERA went down…

Kowar makes his living on a fastball/changeup combo that would make James Shields blush. The fastball has reportedly topped out at 99 mph and, despite just a slightly above average spin rate, Kowar is able to generate plenty of swings and misses up in the zone because his changeup is a legitimate 70-grade offering. ETA: 2020

3. Erick Pena, OF
Age: 16
Highest level in 2019: N/A

Erick Pena finds himself here based on some ridiculously high reputation and potential. Perhaps no one outside of Bobby Witt Jr. in the Royals org has a higher ceiling than Erick Pena. Given that he’s still 16 years old, he’s no sure thing, but if he hits like seemingly everyone thinks he can, he’s a bonafide top 100 prospect heading into 2021. ETA: 2023

4. Daniel Lynch, LHP
Age: 23
Highest level in 2019: A+ (Wilmington)

Daniel Lynch has arguably the highest ceiling of any pitcher in the Royals org. His fastball has topped between 96-97 mph, he has two above average off-speed offerings in his slider and changeup, and his control is well above average as well. Really the biggest questions surrounding Lynch involve his health (missed a good chunk of 2019 due to an arm injury) and just how good his slider and changeup will play at higher levels. If it all comes together, the Royals have a legitimate number two starter for their rotation. ETA: 2021

5. Brady Singer, RHP
Age: 23
Highest level in 2019: AA

Brady Singer has the highest floor of anybody in the Royals organization. He is going to be a big league pitcher at some point in the very near future as long as he stays healthy. Really the only question left is, “How good will he be when he gets here?” Singer’s command is elite and his fastball can consistently run 94 with great arm side run. Singer’s changeup could be the difference between a career in a rotation or bullpen. ETA: 2020

6. Khalil Lee, OF
Age: 21
Highest level in 2019: AA

Here’s a quick list of players aged 21 or younger since 2013 to post a .360+ OBP and 110+ wRC+ in the Texas League (AA):

  • Dylan Carlson
  • Khalil Lee
  • Josh Naylor
  • Luis Urias
  • Matt Olson

That is a very short and rather impressive list that Khalil Lee is on. Ever since being drafted in 2016, Khalil Lee has shown a knack for getting on base. The only mediocre OBP he’s ever posted was .330 and that was during his first stint at AA as a newly turned 20-year old back in 2018. After finishing second in all of MiLB in stolen bases in 2019, Lee figures to be a fixture at the top of the Royals lineup when he reaches the big leagues, which could be as early as this summer. ETA: 2020

7. Kris Bubic, LHP
Age: 22
Highest level in 2019: A+

I would really like to have a 2020 ETA for all four of the pitchers that KC drafted in the first round back in 2018, I just don’t know how it would be possible. The Royals have a ton of guys that are going to need extended looks before the Royals make a final decision. With that said, when ever Bubic does get a chance to show off in KC’s rotation, his changeup will probably get the first and last laugh. It’s a legitimate 60 or 65-grade offering that helped Bubic lead all of MiLB in strikeouts in 2019. I don’t know when his opportunity will arise, but when it does, Bubic is a lock to fill out KC’s starting rotation. ETA: 2021


Tier 3

8. MJ Melendez, C
Age: 21
Highest level in 2019: A+

Luckily for MJ Melendez, there won’t be a pressing need at catcher in the big leagues for KC for some time. Salvador Perez returns this year from Tommy John and fellow prospect Meibrys Viloria seems like a more than serviceable backup for the future. With that said, in a perfect world, MJ Melendez will be the starter behind home plate for a long time in KC. If the robot umpires come to fruition, MJ Melendez instantly becomes one of the top defenders in baseball. Add that in with a left-handed bat that has 20+ HR potential, you’ve got a potential All-Star if he can cut down on the strikeouts. ETA: 2022

9. Kyle Isbel, OF
Age: 22
Highest level in 2019: A+

I’m going to ask you to ignore Isbel’s overall stat line from 2019. Isbel got off to a roaring start in 2019, posting a 202 wRC+ through his first 13 games, then got hurt and didn’t play again until July. After missing two and a half months with multiple injuries, Isbel was quite bad upon returning to the Blue Rocks lineup and went 0-22 over a 6-game stretch at one point. Then at the end of the regular season, Isbel found his stroke again and posted a 135 wRC+ over his last 17 games and was a key cog in a lineup that won the Carolina League. Isbel has a safer profile than someone like Khalil Lee, but I wonder how the tools will play at higher levels. ETA: 2021

10. Austin Cox, LHP
Age: 22
Highest level in 2019: A+

If you asked me today, “Which Royals prospect do you think has the chance to make the biggest jump in the rankings by year’s end?,” it would be Austin Cox. Cox has arguably the best fastball/curveball combination of any pitcher in the Royals minor league system, and definitely the best of any LHP. He was drafted in the 5th round out of Mercer in 2018 where he didn’t find a ton of success in terms of runs allowed, but he did strike out 124 batters in 87.2 IP. Despite being selected in the fifth round, the Royals had a grade on Cox that would suggest he was closer, talent wise, to a second round pick than a fifth. Needless to say they were thrilled to get him. If Cox’ command continues to sit below a 10% BB%, he’s a legitimate candidate to fill out a big league rotation with third starter potential. ETA: 2021

11. Yefri Del Rosario, RHP
Age: 20
Highest level in 2019: N/A

I feel like I need to introduce Yefri Del Rosario with a warning: this is an extremely aggressive ranking that comes with some extreme volatility and risk. Here’s the thing, as an 18-year old in Low-A back in 2018, Yefri Del Rosario was one of the most impressive pitchers I saw all year. Before the June draft, you probably could’ve made the argument that Del Rosario was a top three arm in the entire system. His fastball is electric and his curveball makes people look foolish. Over his last six starts in 2018, Del Rosario posted an ERA of 0.75 with 29 K in 36 IP. Again, he was 18 pitching in full-season ball. He missed all of 2019 with an injury, but he is healthy now and figures to get a full season’s worth of innings in 2o20. ETA: 2022

12. Carlos Hernandez, RHP
Age: 22
Highest level in 2019: A

There’s some risk involved with a guy like Carlos Hernandez, given that we’ve never seen him throw 80 innings in any season, but the stuff is legit. His fastball can approach triple digits and his curveball is an absolute hammer. The Royals added Hernandez to their 40-man roster this offseason, even though he’s never pitched in High-A, to protect him from the Rule 5 Draft. If Hernandez puts it all together, he’s got front of the rotation potential. Even if he doesn’t stick in the rotation, as long as he can stay healthy (which has been problematic), he’s got the stuff to be a very good closer. ETA: 2022

13. Kelvin Gutierrez, 3B
Age: 25
Highest level in 2019: MLB

Kelvin Gutierrez doesn’t get a ton of attention on some sites, and some folks have begun to think twice about him after he struck out in 30% of his big league PA in 2019, but he’s still got a ton of raw ability to be excited about. He has the potential to be a plus defender at the hot corner, and despite his small sample of big league PA, strikeouts have never been a problem for him. If Gutierrez can begin to elevate the baseball, he’s a potential 50+ XBH performer. ETA: 2019

14. Brady McConnell, SS
Age: 21
Highest level in 2019: Rookie

Brady McConnell was one more great season in the SEC away from being a potential top 10 pick in the 2020 MLB Draft. McConnell was slated to start at SS as a freshman for the University of Florida, but got hurt and missed almost all of the 2018 collegiate season. As a draft eligible sophomore in 2019, McConnell hit 15 HR and 11 2B in his first real action in the SEC. The plate discipline numbers aren’t great, and questions remain about whether McConnell will play SS, 3B, or the OF moving forward, but if he can put the power together with a seemingly average or better hit tool, he’s a legitimate candidate for a top 100 list in 2021. ETA: 2022

15. Daniel Tillo, LHP
Age: 23
Highest level in 2019: AA

I have been waiting a long time for Tillo’s eventual move to the bullpen, and it seems that we may have finally arrived. Tillo uses a turbo sinker to generate a ton of ground balls and, since moving to the bullpen, has seen a bit of a jump in velo to his turbo sinker. Tillo’s off-speed stuff isn’t overly impressive, which is why I think a move to the bullpen was necessary, but at 6′ 5″, Tillo’s sinker is a real problem for hitters. I’d expect Tillo in the big league bullpen by midseason. ETA: 2020

16. Jonathan Bowlan, RHP
Age: 23
Highest level in 2019: A+

Jonathan Bowlan was kind of an afterthought in 2018. Signed for a below-slot deal after the Royals drafted four other college pitchers in front of him, I think folks forget that the Royals still took Bowlan in the second round. Bowlan, standing 6′ 6″ 262′, uses an imposing frame to get a fair amount of downhill tilt on his fastball. His fastball and pinpoint control should be enough to carry him to the big leagues in some capacity, but it will be the development of his secondary offerings that determine whether Bowlan will be a starter or a reliever in the bigs. ETA: 2021

17. Yohanse Morel, RHP
Age: 19
Highest level in 2019: A

Morel may have the most electric stuff of any pitcher in the organization. His changeup is very good, his slider will make your head spin, and his fastball can run into the mid-90’s with regularity. Morel’s frame works against him a bit, and he hasn’t shown a great deal control in his young career, but if he can refine the finer points of pitching, his stuff will absolutely carry him to a big league rotation one day. ETA: 2022

18. Nick Heath, OF
Age: 26
Highest level in 2019: AAA

Heath has something that not many prospects have: an 80-grade tool. The kid can flat out fly. He lead all of MiLB in steals last year and missed two weeks of action in the process. He still strikes out way too much for a guy that doesn’t hit for much power, but he knows how to take a walk as well (.392 OBP at AAA). He could find some serious value as a platoon outfielder in Kansas City early on in 2020. ETA: 2020

19. Josh Staumont
Age: 26
Highest level in 2019: MLB

Only a prospect by definition, a lot of the shine has wore off of Staumont. A former top prospect, inconsistencies in his delivery have lead to at times reckless command on the mound. Staumont still strikes a ton of dudes out, but he walks way too many to be trusted in high leverage situations just yet. If he ever figures out any semblance of command, he’s a legitimate option to be an 8th inning guy. ETA: 2019 

20. Seuly Matias, OF
Age: 21
Highest level in 2019: A+

I really wish Seuly Matias had never taken Justus Sheffield deep during the All-Star Futures Game a couple years ago. If he’d have just struck out on three pitches, it would be so much easier for me to write him off. I want to, but gosh darn it he hit 31 HR in 94 games just a season ago. Guys that hit for as much power as Matias can get away with striking out in 30% of their PA. In 2019, Matias struck out in 44.3% of his 221 PA and hit just 4 HR. That will not play at any level. Matias missed the entire second half of the season due to an injury, and should be back in the Carolina League (A+)  to begin 2020. We should have a good idea of what Matias really is by July. ETA: 2022

21. Darryl Collins, OF
Age: 18
Highest level in 2019: Rookie

Collins came onto the prospect scene from seemingly nowhere in 2019. As a 17-year old in the Arizona League, Collins hit .320/.401/.436/.837 with a 0.73 BB/K ratio. Collins’ 132 wRC+ was good for 14th among all qualified AZL hitters and 5th among everyone with at least 200 PA. Standing 6′ 2″, Collins projects to grow a little more into his body and hit for more power as he develops. Showing a great eye at the plate, Collins’ line drive approach figures to allow him to keep the strike outs down as he grows into his power. I am really excited to get an extended look at him in A-ball this summer. ETA: 2022


Tier 4

22. Gabriel Cancel, 1B/2B
Age: 23
Highest level in 2019: AA

I’ve reached the point in the Royals prospect list where we’re going to start getting to prospects with some potential, but are a 50/50 gamble of sticking  in the big leagues, if they ever make it. I was ecstatic to see what Cancel would do at AA in 2019. I was probably higher on Cancel than anyone not named Shaun Newkirk heading into the season. Cancel got off to a roaring start, posting a .925 OPS in the month of April, and then got very pedestrian through the end of July, and then was quite bad in August. In addition to slumping for most of the second half of the season, the Royals began experimenting with Cancel at first base, which would significantly hamper his overall value. I’ll be watching him very closely in 2020. ETA: 2021

23. Michael Gigliotti, CF
Age: 23
Highest level in 2019: A+

I’m not exactly sure what I think about Gigliotti. In some respects, I can see him being a top 10 prospect in this system. He runs extremely well, he’s a potentially elite defender in CF, and he has a knack for being on base. On the other hand, he strikes out way too much for a guy that hits for very little power and he’ll probably begin the year as a 24-year old in A-ball. If everything pans out for him, I can see him being a little like Jarrod Dyson at the big league level. I’m just not sure how confident I am in everything panning out. ETA: 2021

24. Brewer Hicklen, OF
Age: 23
Highest level in 2019: A+

Hicklen has all the tools to be a big league outfielder. He played on the football team at UAB as well as baseball, and is a bit raw, but he is a phenomenal athlete. Hicklen’s 131 wRC+ at High-A was by far the best mark on a woeful Wilmington Blue Rocks offense, and good for 4th among all qualified hitters in the Carolina League last year. He still strikes out too much, but his walk rate improved immensely in 2019, and Hicklen’s athleticism carried him to marks of 14 HR and 39 SB. If he improves the plate discipline, he could be a serviceable platoon option in a big league outfield. ETA: 2021

25. Evan Steele, LHP
Age: 23
Highest level in 2019: A

Steele is a really difficult guy to peg in the list of Royals prospects. There is no question about the talent. The kid is one of the most talented pitchers in the entire organization. But after missing the entire 2018 season due to injury, Steele was shut down in 2019 after just 11 starts and 49 IP. In those 49 innings, Steele struck out 28.4% of the batters he faced and posted an ERA of 2.39 in the South Atlantic League. If Steele can stay even a little healthy, he’s a really good lefty in the back end of a big league bullpen. ETA: 2021

26. Jeison Guzman, SS
Age: 21
Highest level in 2019: A

You will never be able to accuse me of being the “high man” on Guzman, but the Royals thought enough of him to protect him from the Rule 5 Draft this offseason despite Guzman having never appeared in High-A. Guzman is a gifted athlete with the potential of hitting 20+ doubles and stealing 20+ bases some day, but he has not come close to putting it all together yet. Despite his lack of production, Guzman has all of the ability in the world and, should he put it all together, could be a legitimate every day guy up the middle in the big leagues some day. ETA: 2022

27. Zach Haake, RHP
Age: 21
Highest level in 2019: A

Haake has some sick-nasty stuff. He gets plenty of strike outs on the mound and posted an ERA of 2.85 in 75.2 IP in his first full professional season this year in the South Atlantic League (A). He did miss time due to an injury, and questions still remain on whether or not his command will allow him to start full time, but if he can stay healthy he’s every bit as capable of reaching the big leagues in a bullpen role as guys like Evan Steele and Tyler Zuber. ETA: 2022

28. Vinnie Pasquantino, 1B
Age: 22
Highest level in 2019: Rookie

Sometimes you just have to call your shot. I love Pasquantino’s profile. It was really hard for me to not have him a little bit higher on this list. Pasquantino was the Royals 11th round pick out of Old Dominion in 2019, and he did nothing but rake in his professional debut. Ignore the fact that Pasquantino never made it out of Rookie ball. The Royals as an organization put a premium on minor league championships and Pasquantino would have absolutely been promoted had he not been carrying the Burlington Royals (Appalachian League) to a championship run. Had it not been for an injury in his sophomore season, I legitimately believe that Pasquantino would’ve been selected closer to rounds 6-7. He walked more than he struck out in both his freshman and junior campaigns at Old Dominion. Then in his pro debut, he hit 14 HR and had a total of 33 XBH in 57 games. I know it was just rookie ball, but Pasquantino will be 22 years old for the entirety of the 2020 season and I am really excited to see him get into A-ball. ETA: 2022

29. Emmanuel Rivera, 3B
Age: 23
Highest level in 2019: AA

Rivera would probably be staring down a potential big league look in 2020 if the hot corner wasn’t already full in Kansas City. Hunter Dozier, Maikel Franco, and Kelvin Gutierrez all figure to get PA at 3B over Rivera this season, clouding his future a bit. Rivera handles the hot corner really well, but he is pretty tame offensively. He doesn’t hit for much power and he doesn’t walk hardly at all, though he does make consistent contact and shouldn’t be a total black hole in any lineup. Coming off a season in which Rivera posted a 79 wRC+ at AA, time is running out on the Royals third base prospect. ETA: 2021

30. Tyler Zuber, RHP
Age: 24
Highest level in 2019: AA

Zuber was a 6th round pick back in the 2017 MLB Draft even though he was always going to be a bullpen only guy. His stuff isn’t overly fantastic, but it’s good enough to compliment some next level command that helped Zuber post an ERA of 2.42 in 26 innings at AA in 2019. He likely will begin this season in the minors, but he’s on the shortlist of exciting names that Kansas City could call to the big league bullpen at any point in 2020. ETA: 2020

31. Nick Pratto, 1B
Age: 21
Highest level in 2019: A+

Pratto is a former first round pick that drew comparisons to Joey Votto around the time of the 2017 MLB Draft. Nick Pratto has shown no such plate discipline since joining the ranks of professional baseball and I have legitimate questions about what his ceiling is at this point. He doesn’t hit for much power at first base, he strikes out a lot for a guy that doesn’t hit for much power, and his career best OBP to this point is .343. Pratto just turned 21, so he’s still got plenty of time to develop, I’m just not sure what that development will look like for him moving forward. ETA: 2022

32. Grant Gavin, RHP
Age: 24
Highest level in 2019: AA

Gavin’s prospect profile reminds me a bit of Tyler Zuber, even if they are not similar pitchers. Gavin’s fastball doesn’t usually get above 94, but he boasts some well above average spin rates, specifically on his fastball, that allow the pitch to play up. Gavin finished the season with the second best K/9 of any A-ball or better pitcher in the Royals org with 50+ IP (12.55), trailing only Josh Staumont. He still walks far too many hitters (4.30 BB/9 last year), but his fastball/curveball combo give Gavin a chance to be an effective reliever at the big league level. ETA: 2020

33. Rylan Kaufman, LHP
Age: 20
Highest level in 2019: Rookie

Kaufman has spin rates that you just can not teach. Someone has since deleted the video I’ve been looking for on Twitter, but Kaufman was filmed throwing a bullpen at San Jacinto CC in Texas and his curveball was approaching 3,000 RPMs. We’ve been robbed of watching Kaufman pitch professionally over the last two seasons, but it sounds like he’s getting healthier and should be ready to roll early on in 2020. Under the radar arm very much worthy of your attention this summer. ETA: 2023

34. Erick Mejia, UTIL
Age: 25
Highest level in 2019: MLB

I had forgotten that Mejia received 27 big league PA in 2019 before I went and looked. He didn’t hit particularly well in his brief stint, but he showed off some of his plate discipline by drawing four walks. I don’t think Mejia will ever be a big league regular, but I think he’s absolutely capable of platooning in a reserve role for a long time in the big leagues. He stole 34 bases in 2018 at AA and can play defense, pretty well, all over the field. ETA: 2019

35. Delvin Capellan, RHP
Age: 21
Highest level in 2019: Rookie

I’ve been waiting a long time for Capellan to finally pitch in A-ball. He’s slowly made his way from the DSL, to the AZL, to the Appalachian League, and now should finally get a full season go at the South Atlantic League in 2020. Capellan does a little bit of everything well and could very well see a significant jump in the rankings should he perform well in the SALLY this year. ETA: 2023

36. Michael Massey, 2B
Age: 21
Highest level in 2019: Rookie

Massey, a 2019 4th round pick, has a much better profile than he does resume to date. He moves well at 2B, projects to hit for more power as he continues to fill out, doesn’t strike out much, and his swing is so pretty. The results haven’t followed, but I remain optimistic about his future. ETA: 2022

 37. Charlie Neuweiler, RHP
Age: 20
Highest level in 2019: A

Neuweiler may be one of the most slept on pitching prospects in the Royals system. He got off to a roaring start as a 20-year old in A-ball last spring, had an abysmal stretch in the middle of the year, and then ended the season on another scorching hot streak. I’m not 100% sure what happened to Neuweiler in the middle of last season, but he seemed to correct it just fine. Remove five bad starts between May and June and Neuweiler posted an ERA of 2.94 in 128.2 IP for the rest of the season with 130 K to just 50 BB. Obviously you can’t just remove bad starts in real life, and Neuweiler will need to make sure he’s ironed out what ever issues he had during that stretch, but his future is very bright for KC. ETA: 2022

38. Sebastian Rivero, C
Age: 21
Highest level in 2019: AAA

Rivero will more than likely never hit enough to escape a reserve role, but he also might be the best defender in the entire Royals organization. Even if he never carves out a significant role, he’s almost sure to be a backup at the big league level. ETA: 2022

39. Nathan Eaton, UTIL
Age: 23
Highest level in 2019: A

Eaton has a variety of tools that figure to keep him on prospect radars for the foreseeable future. He shows good awareness at the plate, has some pop in his bat, runs well, and can play a few different positions defensively. ETA: 2022

40. Scott Blewett, RHP
Age: 23
Highest level in 2019: AAA

Blewett stands 6′ 6″ and at times gets good run on his 93-95 mph fastball. Doesn’t command the ball at an elite clip but he doesn’t walk many. Not much in the way of strikeout potential but I think that could improve if he switches to the bullpen. ETA: 2020

41. Foster Griffin, LHP
Age: 24
Highest level in 2019: AAA

Thumbing lefty that has little to no strikeout potential in the big leagues. Could survive a big league career as a long reliever or rotation swing man. ETA: 2020

Tier 5

42. Wilmin Candelario, SS
Age: 18
Highest level in 2019: Rookie

This probably seems super hypocritical, given that I have Erick Pena in my top 5, but I hope that speaks more as to what I think of Pena than it sounds like a knock on Candelario. For the record, I think Candelario has a really good chance of becoming a legitimate prospect heading into 2021. There’s also a chance that he Jeison Guzman’s his way into more of a flier by the end of 2021. He’s just too young to tell, but he’s definitely worth keeping on radars until further notice. ETA: 2023

43. Luis De La Rosa, RHP
Age: 17
Highest level in 2019: Rookie

De La Rosa is getting some of the same treatment as Candelario here. Tons of potential, great performance in the DSL last year as a 17-year old, just not enough to go on yet. 100% worth keeping on your radar, could be a top 20 org guy by year’s end. ETA: 2024

44. Jon Heasley, RHP
Age: 22
Highest level in 2019: A

Drafted out of Oklahoma State in 2018, Heasley looked really sharp in his first full year of professional baseball. Great command but questionable secondary offerings. ETA: 2022

45. Alec Marsh, RHP
Age: 21
Highest level in 2019: Rookie

2019 draftee reminds me a bit of current Royal Jakob Junis. Good fastball without a ton of velocity, but a great slider to compliment. Should know more after a couple of months in A-ball. ETA: 2023

46. Grant Gambrell, RHP
Age: 22
Highest level in 2019: Rookie

Another 2019 draftee, Gambrell possesses a pretty solid fastball/curveball combo that could allow him to pitch in a big league bullpen some day. ETA: 2023

47. John Rave, CF
Age: 22
Highest level in 2019: A

Rave is a toolsy outfielder with good range and a leadoff hitter’s profile. Probably didn’t earn his call-up the way Pasquantino deserved one, but there was a need in CF in Low-A and so Rave was promoted. He actually held his own a bit upon arrival to full-season ball and is definitely worth tracking for now. ETA: 2022

48. Omar Florentino, SS
Age: 18
Highest level in 2019: Rookie

Similar story as Candelario here. Lots of projection, good year in the DSL, too early to tell what we have here. While Candelario projects as the better defender, I think there may be more “oomph” in Florentino’s bat. ETA: 2024

49. Arnaldo Hernandez, RHP
Age: 23
Highest level in 2019: AAA

I have no idea what happened to Hernandez in 2019, but as a 22-year old in 2018 he saw a huge jump in velocity and made his way from A+ to AAA and looked great doing it. IF he can return to form, he’s deserving of a much higher ranking than this. ETA: 2021

50. D.J. Burt, UTIL
Age: 24
Highest level in 2019: AA

Burt could reach the big leagues in a reserve role, but I don’t think there’s any hope left for him to be an every day guy. With that said, a guy that can defend, and defend well, 4-5 positions on the field and run like crazy could have value on a 26-man roster. ETA: 2021

 

 

 

 




1 Comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*