Chicago Cubs 2019 Top 50 Prospects

Aramis Ademan - Photo credit Rikk Carlson @rikkcarl10

Chicago Cubs Top 50 Prospects for 2019

When the current Cubs front office took over in the 2011-2012 off-season, they told the fan base that they wanted to build “sustained success” through “position redundancy” in their minor league system. And it worked, sort of, as the Cubs won a World Series for the first time in 108 years back in 2016. But the Cubs then subtly shifted their focus to a “win now” mode rather than shifting back to the primary focus of sustained success after reaching their goal. In order to maintain a “competitive window,” the Cubs have essentially frozen out their minor-leaguers from their major league roster, save a couple of former first-round picks. Instead of supplying a pipeline of talent, the Cubs minor league system essentially became a vault they simply raided from time to time in order to acquire major league players.

That’s why it was no surprise for a few observers that with one of the most talented rosters in baseball, the 2018 Cubs wheezed and coughed their way through the second half of the season and put up only token resistance in the post-season. With a full season minor league system in shambles, the Cubs had no reserves to call on to bring a spark to the big-league club.

However, the Cubs front office had one of the deepest drafts of their tenure in 2018, begging several questions for 2019, the first being, are the Cubs interested in developing more than just their high round draft picks? Next, are the Cubs willing to promote some of their college-experienced picks to fill gaps in the upper levels of their system? But most importantly, is the Cubs front office capable of keeping their hands off their minor league players as trade-bait in order for the system to regenerate?

Let’s take a look at these minor league players whom I rank as the Cubs Top 50 Prospects for 2019.


Prospects1500 Tiers:
Tier 1: Players with high expectations of both making the majors and playing at an All-Star level for a number of years
Tier 2: Players with an above average expectation of making the majors and being a solid contributor
Tier 3: Players with an average expectation of making the majors and being a solid contributor
Tier 4: Players who have the potential of making the majors, or have high likelihood of making the majors but providing minimal impact (e.g. middle reliever, low-ceiling UT guys)
Tier 5: Players who are worth keeping an eye on, but likely to never make a team’s 40-man roster


Tier 1:

1. Nico Hoerner, SS
Age: 21
2018 Highest Level: Single-A (South Bend)

Nico Horner by Rikk Carlson

Almost as soon as his name was announced as their first selection in the 2018 draft, Hoerner became the Cubs’ best prospect. But when Hoerner suffered a minor injury, the Cubs shut him down for the regular season and made a rare move of assigning him to the Arizona Fall League. Hoerner continued to dominate; going .337/.362/.506/.867 with 4 doubles, 4 triples, a home run, and 11 RBI in 21 games. The Cubs have a history of moving first round picks quickly through the system, especially when they perform like Hoerner has to date.
ETA: Mid-to-late season 2019 to early 2020


Tier 2:

2. Adbert Alzolay, RHP
Age: 23
2018 Highest Level: Triple-A (Iowa)
After signing in 2013, Alzolay toiled in obscurity until bursting on the scene in 2017. Alzolay was readying himself to contribute in the majors in 2018 when sidelined by a lat strain. The injury effected his overall numbers, which does not reflect the how Alzolay was capable of dominating at times. While Alzolay has a four-pitch arsenal that he can command, it remains to be seen whether the Cubs will trust a rookie during their competitive window.
ETA: Mid-to-late 2019

3. Miguel Amaya, C
Age:19
2018 Highest Level: Single-A (South Bend)

Miguel Amaya by Rikk Carlson

The Cubs usually let their pitching staff call the shots as to who lines up behind the dish, which is why there are always persistent rumors over them acquiring a veteran backstop. It is why you can temper your enthusiasm over Amaya in spite his obvious talent. Despite a second half slump, Amaya hit a respectable .256/.349/.403/.752 with 12 home runs and 52 RBI in his first full season at 18 years old. Amaya is also a polished receiver. But with the Cubs having trouble finding playing time for two talented young catchers already in the majors, you have to wonder whether Amaya’s future is with this organization.
ETA: 2021

4. Brailyn Marquez, LHP
Age:19
2018 Highest Level: Single-A (South Bend)
For a front office that has not developed an entirely home-grown pitching prospect even though they have been on the job for six plus years, Marquez is the closest pitcher they have to being a top of the rotation starter. In 12 games between Short-Season A Eugene and South Bend, Marquez fanned 59 in 54.2 innings against only 16 walks. Marquez will test the stodgy promotional history of the Cubs for pitchers if he continues to be successful.
ETA: 2021

5. Cole Roederer, OF
Age:19
2018 Highest Level: Rookie League
In what is shaping up as a very good 2018 draft, supplemental second round pick Roederer may end up being the best of the bunch. Both a surprise selection and surprise signing based on a reportedly strong college commitment, Roederer tore up the rookie league while facing competition as much as four years older. With 5 home runs and 13 stolen bases in 36 games and slashing .275/.354/.465/.819, Roederer will progress rapidly if he maintains similar production.
ETA: 2021


Tier 3:

6. Alex Lange, RHP
Age: 23
2018 Highest Level: High-A (Myrtle Beach)
The Cubs have used a shotgun approach to drafting pitchers over the past few years, and Lange has emerged as the one most likely to get the first true shot at the majors. The 2017 first round pick is the type of strike-thrower the Cubs are looking for, posting a 1.180 WHIP and a 101:38 strikeout-to-walk ratio in his first full season. The Cubs may unleash Lange this coming season and let his production dictate his level.
ETA: 2020

7. Justin Steele, LHP
Age: 23
2018 Highest Level: Double-A (Tennessee)
After going down to Tommy John surgery in 2017, Steele has made a miraculous comeback. While the Cubs pushed Steele to Double-A to end 2018, he will probably return to continue to re-establish himself after a less than stellar Arizona Fall League performance. Steele has pushed his fastball into the upper 90’s, and opinion is split as to whether he would be better served staying in the rotation, or becoming a high leverage reliever.
ETA:2020

8. Richard Gallardo, RHP
Age: 17
2018 Highest Level: Has yet to play
Projecting players as young as this is always risky, but scouts are all over Gallardo’s ability to rise rapidly through the system with his advanced feel for pitching. The Cubs invested a million dollars in Gallardo, and will do whatever it takes to show that it was well spent. Spring training will be telling, but it would not be a surprise for Gallardo to remain stateside and play in the rookie league or Short Season-A.
ETA: 2022

9. Zack Short, SS
Age: 23
2018 Highest Level: Double-A (Tennessee)

Zack Short interviews with Tom Usiak by Lauren Usiak

With a .356 on-base percentage and .417 slugging average, Short hit better than his .227 average indicates. That should improve in the hitter-friendly PCL this coming season, along with his 17 home runs and 47 extra base hits. Short was also voted the Southern League’s best defensive shortstop. However, the Cubs have thrown a few obstacles in his path to the big leagues, so he may return to Double-A.
ETA: 2019

10. Brennen Davis, OF
Age:19
2018 Highest Level: Rookie League
One of the Cubs’ second round picks in 2018, Davis is more of an athlete playing baseball at this point. Davis brings great speed and athleticism to the defense, along with a strong throwing arm. After hitting .298/.431/.333/.764 in 18 rookie league games, Davis could pole vault over Short Season ball and go directly to full-season A ball to start 2019.
ETA: 2022

11. Keegan Thompson, RHP
Age: 23
2018 Highest Level: Double-A (Tennessee)
Part of the massive investment the Cubs made in pitching prospects recently, Thompson has advanced mainly by being more polished than the rest of his cohort. Thompson struggled a bit in his promotion to Double-A, which is why he may repeat the level in 2019. Overall, Thompson was 9-6 with a 3.61 ERA, 1.149 WHIP, and 115 strikeouts in 129.2 innings.
ETA: 2020

12. Reivaj Garcia, INF
Age:17
2018 Highest Level: Rookie League
This switch-hitter absolutely tore up a league in which the average age was 3.5 years older in 2018, slashing .302/.362/.355/.716 at just 16 years old. While Reivaj Garcia did not show a lot of pop, his approach could be just what baseball is looking for if launch angles and hitting over shifts becomes passé in the near future.
ETA: 2023

13. Dakota Mekkes, RHP
Age: 24
2018 Highest Level: Triple-A (Iowa)
Most organizations would be looking at a pitcher like Mekkes to open the season in their major league bullpen. Mekkes totaled a 4-0 record with 11 saves, a 1.17 ERA, 1.211 WHIP, and 71 strikeouts in 53.2 innings between Double and Triple-A. But with Chicago in a “win now” mode, it may take a while before they bring up Mekkes.
ETA: 2019

14. Aramis Ademan, SS
Age: 20
2018 Highest Level: High-A (Myrtle Beach)

Aramis Ademan by Rikk Carlson

Both the Cubs and Ademan may regret being too aggressive in promoting him last season due to his lack of success. Ademan showed a regression across the board, posting a .207/.291/.273/.563 line and a 3.76 range factor on defense. Now, Ademan is bracketed by some advanced talent both above and below his level in the Cubs’ system. How he reacts to the pressure will be telling.
ETA: 2022

15. Brendon Little, LHP
Age: 22
2018 Highest Level: Single-A (South Bend)
Consider 2018 a lost season for Little, as he had all kinds of trouble with his mechanics. That translated to a whopping 5.15 ERA and 1.470 WHIP to go along with an 5-11 record and 90 strikeouts in 101.1 innings. Little separates himself from some of the other Cubs pitching prospects in that he can run his fastball into the mid-90’s. If his mechanical issues are straightened out, this lefty can advance rapidly.
ETA: 2022

16. Paul Richan, RHP
Age: 21
2018 Highest Level: Short Season-A (Eugene)
Another supplemental second round pick in 2018, Richan falls into the same category as Lange, Thompson, and several other pitchers further down the list as a pitcher with average measurables, but one that throws strikes. Richan had an outstanding 31:5 strikeout to walk ratio in 29.2 innings, to go along with 2.12 ERA and 0.809 WHIP. Like many other college-level pitchers the Cubs have selected high in the draft, expect Richan to skip at least one level in his 2019 assignment.
ETA: 2021

17. Duncan Robinson, RHP
Age: 25
2018 Highest Level: Triple-A (Iowa)
Like Short and Mekkes ahead of him, most MLB organizations would be going into 2019 looking for a roster spot for Robinson. But with the Cubs, Robinson will still have to toil in Triple-A despite putting up major league worthy numbers throughout his career. Splitting time between Double and Triple-A, Robinson went 8-4 with a 3.11 ERA, 1.242 WHIP and 119 strikeouts in 141.2 innings. Robinson is also somewhat of a minor league workhorse, averaging over 5.1 innings per appearance.
ETA: 2019

18. Cory Abbott, RHP
Age: 23
2018 Highest Level: High-A (Myrtle Beach)
Another highly polished pitcher with extensive college experience, there are mixed views on Abbott. With a four-pitch arsenal, some cite his command as a reason for hope while other point out the lack of any one outstanding pitch as a cause for concern. Abbott advanced rapidly by going 8-6 with a 2.50 ERA, 1.157 WHIP and 131 strikeouts in 115 innings in Single-A and High-A. How Abbott fares in Double-A will be a good indication of his future.
ETA: 2021

19. Trent Giambrone, INF/OF
Age: 25
2018 Highest Level: Double-A (Tennessee)
Every system has a plucky little player that everyone roots for, and the Cubs are no exception with Giambrone. At only 5’8”, Giambrone has more power with 17 homers in 2018, and more speed with 26 stolen bases than you would imagine. Giambrone’s hitting line of .251/.333/.440/.772, however, is less impressive. And while Giambrone has played six different positions, he has played none of them well.
ETA: 2020

20. Jose Albertos, RHP
Age: 20
2018 Highest Level: Single-A (South Bend)

Jose Albertos by Rikk Carlson

Once considered the Cubs best pitching prospect, Albertos had the type of season in 2018 that usually causes one to search for another line of work. With an upper 90’s fastball and good secondary pitches, Albertos never found his command as his atrocious 14.84 ERA was only outdone by a ghastly 3.330 WHIP, logging time in Single-A and Short Season-A. Albertos is young enough to come back from such a performance, but tread lightly!
ETA: 2022

21. Jeremiah Estrada, RHP
Age: 20
2018 Highest Level: Did not play
Drafted in the sixth round in 2017, Estrada pitched only six innings before going down with an elbow injury. Estrada ha a fastball that sits in the mid-90’s to go along with an advanced change-up. How he bounces back from injury and develops a breaking pitch will determine a lot concerning Estrada’s future.
ETA: 2023

22. Michael Rucker, RHP
Age: 24
2018 Highest Level: Double-A (Tennessee)
Part of the great pitching expedition of 2016-17 drafts by the Cubs, Rucker raises himself among his contemporaries by his versatility. Rucker started the entire 2018 season at Double-A but didn’t work through the opposition three times very often. For the year, Rucker had a 1.123 WHIP and 118 strikeouts in 132.2 innings while going 9-6 with a 3.73 ERA. Rucker has been effective in the past out of the pen, where his low-90’s fastball and curve may play up better.
ETA: 2020

23. Yovanny Cruz, RHP
Age: 19
2018 Highest Level: Short Season-A (Eugene)
As you may have noticed, the Cubs have amassed quite a few young pitchers with potential, and Cruz is one of them. Cruz already has a sturdy frame and has a sinker/slider combination that gave him a 55:13 strikeout to walk ratio over two levels in 2018. Cruz also has some experience with pressure, pitching for playoff teams in both the rookie league and Short Season.
ETA: 2022

24. Andy Weber, INF
Age: 21
2018 Highest Level: Short Season-A (Eugene)
The last player signed by the Cubs, fifth round pick Weber has the bat control and contact ability demonstrated by many of his 2018 draft cohorts. After knocking off some rust in the rookie league, Weber slashed .291/.363/.329/.692 in 23 games with Eugene. Primarily thought of as a second baseman, Weber played mostly short (and played it well) along with third base. Skipping to High-A in 2019 is pretty much a foregone conclusion.
ETA: 2021

25. Tyson Miller, RHP
Age: 23
2018 Highest Level: High-A (Myrtle Beach)
There are some that like Miller’s chances because a good July 2018 gave them hope, while others point out the weak contact he induces. But in the end, Miller had only moderate success that did not distinguish him from other Cub prospects with the same profile. Miller’s 1.094 WHIP and 126 strikeouts in 127 innings were good, but only translated into a 9-9 record with a 3.54 ERA.
ETA:2021


Tier 4:

26. Jared Young, 1B/OF
Age: 23
2018 Highest Level: High-A (Myrtle Beach)

Jared Young by Rikk Carlson

After some off-season trades, Young remains one of the few left-handed power prospects in the Cubs’ system. A converted middle infielder, Young has adapted well to the outfield and first base. Combined between Single-A and High-A, Young slashed .300/.357.485/.842 with 19 doubles, 8 triples, 16 home runs, 76 RBI, and 7 stolen bases.
ETA: 2021

27. Jimmy Herron, OF
Age: 22
2018 Highest Level: Single-A (South Bend)
The biggest concern for 2018 third round pick Herron was rumored TJ surgery on his throwing elbow. That has not yet occurred and Herron was able to bat .259/.361/.381/.743 with 5 doubles, 4 homers and 19 RBI in 42 games. If Herron is physically sound, he has the type of plate discipline, contact ability, and athleticism to lead-off.
ETA: 2021

28. Jhonny Pereda, C
Age: 22
2018 Highest Level: High-A (Myrtle Beach)
The Cubs survived a scare this off-season when Pereda was passed over in the Rule 5 draft. Always considered a good defensive catcher, Pereda improved his offense, posting a .272/.347/.363/.710 line with 12 doubles, 2 triples, 8 home runs and 57 RBI in High-A. Pereda followed that up with a good performance in the Arizona Fall League.
ETA: 2021

29. Bailey Clark, RHP
Age: 24
2018 Highest Level: High-A (Myrtle Beach)
Battling injuries for his entire professional career, Clark has the right make-up for a late inning reliever. Clark has an upper-90’s fastball and curve, and is making the transition to the pen after making 16 starts to begin his career. Clark was 4-2 with a save, a 1.89 ERA, 1.088 WHIP, and 63 strikeouts in 57 innings, but has to stay off the DL.
ETA: 2020

30. Erich Uelmen, RHP
Age: 22
2018 Highest Level: High-A (Myrtle Beach)

Erich Uelmen by Rikk Carlson

A 2017 fourth round pick, Uelmen will have to harness his command to separate himself from a number of similar pitchers. With a mid-90’s sinking fastball, slider and change, Uelmen gets a lot of ground balls. Uelmen went 8-8 with a 3.83 ERA, 1.366 WHIP, and 82 strikeouts in 89.1 innings, but may become a right-hand specialist out of the pen.
ETA: 2021

31. Trevor Clifton, RHP
Age: 23
2018 Highest Level: Triple-A (Iowa)
A tenth-round pick in 2013, Clifton has battled his way through the Cubs system and now appears to have no where else to go. The Cubs Minor League Pitcher of the Year in 2016 suffered a terrible 2017 and needed to return to Double-A in 2018. Clifton received a mid-season promotion to Triple-A and ended the year going 7-7 with a 3.43 ERA, 1.254 WHIP, and 101 strikeouts in 126 innings (24 starts).
ETA: 2019

32. Luis Verdugo, INF
Age: 18
2018 Highest Level: Rookie League
The biggest reason why scouts are more “into” a prospect like Verdugo than someone like Reivaj Garcia is his power potential. Considered an excellent defender with a projectable body, 26% of Verdugo’s hits last season went for extra bases. However, Verdugo still has a lot of work to do offensively, as he slashed .193/.264/.295/.559 with 4 doubles, a triple, 4 home runs, and 20 RBI in 47 games.
ETA: 2023

33. Christopher Morel, INF
Age: 19
2018 Highest Level: Short Season-A (Eugene)
Another highly projectable prospect for the Cubs under the age of 20, Morel lacks the polish or production of either Garcia or Verdugo. The Cubs were a little too aggressive in assigning Morel to Eugene to start 2018, as he performed better when pulled back to the AZL. For the year, Morel had a .216/.264/.299/.563 line with 8 doubles, 3 homers, and 20 RBI in 54 games.
ETA: 2023

34. Oscar De La Cruz, RHP
Age: 23
2018 Highest Level: Double-A (Tennessee)
Once considered one of the Cubs’ best pitching prospects, De La Cruz has suffered injuries and suspensions since his break-out season of 2015. De La Cruz’s fastball/curve combo still ranks as one of the best in the Cubs’ system, but he only appeared in 16 games before being suspended. De La Cruz had a 5.24 ERA and 1.384 WHIP and 73 strikeouts, and needs to get his act together. Now!
ETA: 2020

35. Duane Underwood Jr., RHP
Age: 24
2018 Highest Level: MLB
One of the last remnants of this front office’s first draft in 2012, the Cubs still are not sure on how they want to use Underwood. Up until mid-season 2018, Underwood was used exclusively as a starter. In his first year at Triple-A, Underwood was successful in neither role as he was 4-10 with a 4.53. ERA, 1.374 WHIP, and 105 strikeouts in 119.1 innings.
ETA: 2019

36. Nelson Velazquez, OF
Age: 20
2018 Highest Level: Single-A (South Bend)

Nelson Velazquez by Rikk Carlson

In what seemed to be a pattern in 2018, the Cubs appeared to push Velazquez a little too much. The 19-year old Velazquez debuted at South Bend in May, but soon looked overwhelmed. Velazquez recovered in Eugene, posting a .231/.299/.380/.679 line with 19 doubles, 2 triples, 11 home runs, 40 RBI, and 15 stolen bases.
ETA: 2022

37. Matt Swarmer, RHP
Age: 25
2018 Highest Level: Double-A (Tennessee)
The Cubs Minor League Pitcher of the Year for 2018, Swarmer has yet to appear on any top prospect lists for 2019. Swarmer presents with much of the same repertoire as most of the 2016-17 pitching draftees, low 90’s fastball/slider/change. Last season Swarmer was able to use that arsenal to go 9-8 with a 3.22 ERA, 1.041 WHIP, and a 135:21 strikeout to walk ratio.
ETA: 2020

38. Luis Rodriguez, LHP
Age: 19
2018 Highest Level: Dominican League
One of the biggest mysteries in the Cubs’ system, here’s hoping that 2019 gives us more information on Luis Rodriguez. Part of the Cubs’ Mexican League pipeline, no one is even sure what pitches this 6’1”, 190 lbs. lefty throws. Whatever pitches they were, it was successful as he led the league with a 0.73 ERA and was tied for second with a 0.734 WHIP.
ETA: 2023

39. Danis Correa, RHP
Age: 19
2018 Highest Level: Rookie League
A native of Columbia, Correa saw action in only two games last season. No one is sure why Correa was shut down, but a pitcher who sits in the upper 90’s and can touch 100 mph is someone to take note of.
ETA: 2023

40. Erick Leal, RHP
Age: 23
2018 Highest Level: High-A (Myrtle Beach)
Another great injury comeback story, Leal is an example of production over potential. A change-up specialist, Leal gets the most out of his command/control to outdo pitchers with a better arsenal. Returning in late May, Leal was 1-1 with a save, a 1.41 ERA, 0.817 WHIP, and 61 strikeouts in 63.2 innings, mostly out of the pen. Leal has also had a very good offseason.
ETA: 2020


Tier 5:
41. James Norwood, RHP

Age: 25
2018 Highest Level: MLB
Battling injuries throughout his career, flame-throwing Norwood got his first chance at the big leagues last season. Despite an upper-90’s fastball, command has always been an issue as Norwood has never shown the passion to close out ballgames.
ETA: 2019

42. Tom Hatch, RHP
Age: 24
2018 Highest Level: Double-A (Tennessee)
Like many upper-round pitching selections the Cubs have made over the past few years, Hatch has been rushed through the system without merit. Hatch conforms to the cookie-cutter Cubs pitching profile of low 90’s fastball/slider/change, and still can project as a back of the rotation/long relief pitcher.
ETA: 2020

43. Chesny Young, INF/OF
Age: 26
2018 Highest Level: Triple-A (Iowa)
Essentially a two-time minor league batting champion, Young has struggled with injuries the past two seasons. While Young has yet to prove himself at Triple-A, he has the type of versatility, athleticism, and contact skills to become a super-utility bat off the bench if given a chance.
ETA: 2019

44. Mark Zagunis, OF
Age: 25
2018 Highest Level: MLB
A converted catcher, Zagunis is now a corner outfielder with limited power who has ended the past two seasons injured. Zagunis has some of the best plate disciple in the system, but has not hit above .275 in three seasons at Triple-A.
ETA: 2019

45. D.J. Wilson, OF
Age: 22
2018 Highest Level: High-A (Myrtle Beach)
One of the most athletic players for the Cubs franchise, Wilson has had trouble the past two seasons staying injury-free. Wilson has the ability to be a 5-tool player, but has never developed his plate approach to tap into his potential.
ETA: 2022

46. Dillon Maples, RHP
Age: 26
2018 Highest Level: MLB
After nearly quitting baseball a few years ago, Maples has now risen all the way to the majors. Success at that level has been a different story. Maples has some of the best spin rates in baseball, but control and command have been consistent issues.
ETA: 2019

47. Luke Reynolds, 3B/1B
Age: 23
2018 Highest Level: Short Season-A (Eugene)
In a system that lacks any left-handed power, 2018 10th round pick Reynolds fills a need. Reynolds slashed .289/.383/.421/.804 with 11 doubles, a triple, and a home run in 36 games. Reynolds may be force-fed up to High-A to start 2019.
ETA: 2022

48. Ian Rice, C/IB
Age: 25
2018 Highest Level: Double-A (Tennessee)
A hit-first catcher/first baseman, Rice continues to improve behind the dish. Rice’s power took a dip in 2018, but he improved his contact rate. Rice has the ability of a platoon/back-up player.
ETA: 2020

49. Fernando Kelli, OF
Age: 20
2018 Highest Level: Short Season-A (Eugene)
As the old baseball adage says “you can’t teach speed,” and Kelli has plenty of speed. Kelli already has 109 stolen bases in 182 professional games. If Kelli continues to improve his offensive approach, he can turn into something special.
ETA: 2023

50. Fabian Pertuz, SS
Age: 18
2018 Highest Level: Dominican League
A slick-fielding shortstop, Pertuz was also offensively advanced for the DSL. After hitting .298/.419/.427/.846 with 10 doubles, 6 triples. 2 home runs, 39 RBI, and 36 stolen bases in 62 games, how Pertuz does in his first spring stateside will determine where he begins his 2019.
ETA: 2023




About Tom Usiak 12 Articles
Born and raised on Chicago's Northwest side, Tom is entering his ninth year covering the Cubs minor league system, writing for prestigious sites such as Chicago Cubs Online, Locked On Cubs, and Cubs Den. Over that period, Tom has published interviews with top prospects such as Aramis Ademan, Miguel Amaya, Willson Contreras, Jeimer Candelario, Dylan Cease, Ian Happ, Eloy Jimenez, and Gleyber Torres. Known as "Tom U" across the internet, Tom also has a close working relationship with the front offices of all four of the Cubs' full season minor league teams. A frequent guest of the South Bend Cubs on WSBT radio, Tom has also written monthly articles for the South Bend Cubs' stadium program.

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