New York Mets 2020 Top 50 Prospects

Tony Dibrell, Florida State League All-Star Game, June 15, 2019 - photo credit Bryan Green on Flickr

While the Mets farm system is talented, most of its top prospects are in the lowest levels. The 2019 season was not kind to these top players, other than NL Rookie of the Year Pete Alonso. The only prospect in the top 15 from last season’s preseason top 50 Mets list who drastically improved his stock is since-traded Simeon Woods Richardson. Nevertheless, the system possesses potential star pieces to trade in pursuit of an available star.

Brodie Van Wagenen has proved that he holds minimal value in prospects with more modest projection, between splurging for three top level draft prospects over a more balanced approach and trading prospects for major-league-ready role players. While I agree with this overall approach, these prospects still hold value, and many of his trades have overlooked that value. Don’t be surprised to see more prospects from this second tier moved for more major league depth, such as a backup catcher or a middle reliever, as they chase a playoff spot.

* List does not include anyone who already made their MLB debut


Prospects1500 Tiers:
Tier 1: Players with high expectations of both making the majors and playing at an All-Star level for a number of years
Tier 2: Players with above-average expectation of making the majors and being a solid contributor
Tier 3: Players with average expectation of making the majors and being a solid contributor
Tier 4: Players who have the potential of making the majors, or high likelihood of making the majors but providing minimal impact (e.g. middle reliever, low-ceiling UT guys)
Tier 5: Players who are worth monitoring, but likely to never make a team’s 40-man roster


Tier 1

None


Tier 2

1. Ronny Mauricio, SS
Opening Day Age: 18
2019 Highest Level: A
2019 Notable Statistics: .268 BA while 3.5 years below league average age
Now the Mets consensus top prospect, Mauricio is what future superstars look like at 18. Signed during the 2017 J2 period for $2.1 million, Mauricio is a projectable, uber-athletic 6’ 3,” while only 166 pounds. With so much hype, I feel like I am undervaluing Mauricio by putting him as a Tier 2 prospect. Mauricio’s upside includes plus-power and hit tools, as he has impressive bat speed and control. Mauricio is a switch hitter, but is much better as a lefty facing righties, with an OPS nearly 200 points higher. Defensively, Mauricio has all the tools to stay at shortstop. However, with his body expected to grow, he will likely shift to 3B, where he should be a fine fit, as his glove and arm will be better-than-average there. Between Mauricio’s age and heading to the notoriously pitcher friendly Florida State League (A+), it is important to read beyond the scouting report for Mauricio. Instead, look for Mauricio to work on his plate approach (K% & BB% @ 19.6% & 4.6%), power (average flyball distance – 283’), and batted ball profile (fewer ground balls – 53%). Mauricio already has contact skills, something rare in tall, lanky prospects, with a respectable batting average and a minimal swinging strike rate. If Mauricio improves in these areas, look for him to rise to the top 25 prospects in baseball.

2. Francisco Alvarez, C
Opening Day Age: 18
2019 Highest Level: Rookie – Appalachian League
2019 Notable Statistics: 155 wRC+ while 2.5 and 3.5 years below league average age
Ranking a player with only 182 plate appearances in affiliated baseball this high may seem like a stretch, but I believe Alvarez can be baseball’s next great catcher. I debated ranking Alvarez ahead of Mauricio. Signed to the largest IFA contract in Mets history ($2.9 million), Alvarez was known for his advanced bat and work ethic. Between the GCL and Appy leagues, Alvarez showed that off. At 2.5 and 3.5 years below league average age, Alvarez slashed .312/.407/.510 with a 20.3 K% and 11.5 BB%. Alvarez has the potential to develop both above average hit and power tools. The worry with Alvarez stems from his defense, as if he had to switch off catcher, he would likely move to a much less desirable position such as 3B or 2B. At 5’11” and 220 pounds, the worry is that Alvarez would not maintain his body to play catcher. Reports from his inaugural season were overwhelmingly positive, showing good agility, arm strength, and catching, as well as being fit for his weight. As I wrote for Prospects1500’s New Year’s wishes for each team, with the implementation of the automated strike zone, I would love to see the Mets get aggressive with Alvarez, putting him at a level where his bat is challenged. I put Alvarez inside my top 100 prospects due to the immense upside he possesses at the weakest position on the diamond.

3. Andres Gimenez, SS
Age: 21
2019 Highest Level: AA
2019 Notable Statistics: .371/.413/.586 in 75 PA in the 2019 AFL
Another former top international signing, Gimenez landed with the Mets for $1.2 million in 2015. Most of Gimenez real value comes from his well-above-average defense. Gimenez should be able to play wherever the Mets need him on the infield. Additionally, there were rumors of the Mets trying Gimenez in center field, something with his plus speed and baseball IQ, he should be able to learn if needed. Gimenez’s bat has been inconsistent. Gimenez has more raw power than in-game power, leading some to think an approach leaning more heavily on fly balls, and away from his naturally level swing, would suit him. While Gimenez did increase his flyball rates, this did not lead to more success, with a 124 and 100 wRC+ in A+ and AA in 2018, and a 105 wRC+ in 2019. When the Mets sent him to the Arizona Fall League, however, Gimenez returned to a level swing, producing the impressive slash line above. With this swing and Gimenez’ other tools, a bat which produces 10-15 home runs and 20+ stolen bases, while playing an important up-the-middle defensive position will be an incredibly valuable real and fantasy player.


Tier 3

4. Thomas Szapucki, LHP
Age: 23
2019 Highest Level: AA
2019 Notable Statistics: 2.63 ERA, 27.3 K%
Back in 2016, Szapucki was the talk of the Mets minor leagues. Putting up K% of 40.4 and 41.8% while being 0.9 and 1.3 years below average age in the Appy and New York – Penn Leagues, Szapucki flashed top-of-the-rotation upside. Flash forward to 2020, Szapucki had a lengthy TJ stint but is back pitching. Szapucki is the Mets best pitching prospect that is relatively close to the majors. With his addition to the 40 man roster this offseason, he figures to have a shot at throwing MLB innings this season, whether as a starter or power reliever. Szapucki throws an average fastball and a plus curveball. His development as a starter hinges on his changeup. Regardless, Szapucki is nearly MLB-ready and possesses exciting upside when accounting for the Mets pitching development and his natural talent.

5. Mark Vientos, 3B/1B
Age: 20
2019 Highest Level: A
2019 Notable Statistics: 300’ Average Flyball Distance – 24.2 K% – 4.8 BB%
With a 300’ average flyball distance, Vientos already has good raw power. Vientos has a 6’4” 185 pound frame, leading many to believe his power could develop into 30-40 MLB home run power. Although Vientos does get some leeway for playing his home games in pitcher-friendly Segra Park, I still docked Vientos due to his plate approach this season (24.2 K% – 4.8 BB%). He will move to the Florida State League, another very pitcher-friendly league, so he will likely have another ordinary statistical year. The bigger concern for me is the concerns over his defense. If Vientos is unable to stay at 3B, he will have to move to 1B, greatly lowering his real and fantasy value – especially on the Mets. However, Vientos’s power potential gives him the ability to overcome many red flags and still maintain a high rating.

6. Brett Baty, 3B/1B
Age: 20
2019 Highest Level: A – NYPL
2019 Notable Statistics: 28.5 K% – 15.4 BB%
Baty and Vientos share many similarities. Although drafted two years prior to Baty, Vientos is still slightly younger than Baty. Both players are offensively-oriented players, although when the Mets took Baty, they seemed convinced he would stick at 3B. Baty’s power, although above average, to me doesn’t seem as robust as Vientos’, leading me to rate Vientos more highly. However, between his average to above-average hit tool, and his conservative plate approach (28.5 K% – 15.4 BB%), Baty’s power is more likely to play in games.

7. Matthew Allan, RHP
Age: 18
2019 Highest Level: A – NYPL
2019 Notable Statistics: 2.61 ERA while 2.3 and 3.3 years below league average age
Although he signed for $2.5 million, the second highest bonus for a high school pitcher in the past year’s draft (after Quinn Priester), Allan does not seem to have the same upside as one would expect from a top tier high school pitcher. Allan seems to have gotten his rating based on his “safety” as a high school pitcher, as he should throw three average to above-average pitches (fastball, curveball, changeup), have mid-90s velocity with the ability to touch high-90s, and minimal projection left in his body (6’3” 225 pounds). His upside is limited by his limited athleticism, likely targeting him to a mid-rotation arm. In his small sample size in affiliated ball (10.1 IP), Allan showed he is much more polished than most high school pitchers (2.61 ERA reaching the NYPL). If Allan can continue progress on his pitches, he should show mid-rotation upside.

8. David Peterson, LHP
Age: 24
2019 Highest Level: AA
2019 Notable Statistics: 2.91 xFIP – 3.19 FIP – 4.19 ERA
Since being drafted in the first round in the 2017 draft, Peterson has seemingly been disliked by Met fans due to his high-floor, low-ceiling profile. Peterson throws 4 roughly average pitches in his fastball, slider, curveball, and changeup. He throws around 90 from the left side. However, where Peterson shines is his batted ball profile. Peterson excels at keeping the ball on the ground, with a 52.6% groundball rate. With a high ground ball rate, Peterson is very much exposed to infield defense. His team’s poor infield defense this past year explains his xFIP (2.91) below his FIP (3.19), which was lower than his ERA (4.19). His ground ball rates along with a good 24.5 K% and 7.2 BB% lead to a solid case for a valuable back-end starter. With Peterson posting good numbers in AA, look for Peterson to throw MLB innings this year. As a ground ball pitcher behind what was one of the worst infield defenses in baseball, we’ll need to be patient with Peterson’s results.

9. Alexander Ramirez, OF
Age: 17
2019 Highest Level: N/A
2019 Notable Statistics: N/A
Since 2015, players signed for over $1 million in international free agency have usually become big-time prospects, like Gimenez, Mauricio, and Alvarez. In 2019, the only prospect signed over $1 million was Ramirez, having signed for $2.1 million. While it may be bold to put somebody who has yet to play in an affiliated game inside the top 10, Ramirez has the potential to fly up these ratings. Ramirez already has an advanced plate approach and the potential to impact the game with power and speed. Ramirez’ 6’3” 175 pound frame features good power for a 17 year old. As he fills out, he may lose a step, to average speed. Ramirez should be able to play center, although if he loses more speed than anticipated, he can easily move to either corner with an above-average arm. Look for Ramirez to gain hype as more scouts see his tools in games.

10. Josh Wolf, RHP
Age: 19
2019 Highest Level: GCL
2019 Notable Statistics: 8 IP – 12K – 1BB
Although he throws with a funky, violent motion, Wolf has not experienced any arm troubles thus far in his career. Wolf’s fastball and curveball project to be plus pitches, while he must work on his changeup to remain a starter. Wolf was a late riser in the draft process due to his newfound mid-to-low 90s velocity, known more for his athleticism and intangibles. Wolf possesses great upside if he can stay healthy and continue to improve his changeup and overall command.

11. Junior Santos, RHP
Age: 18
2019 Highest Level: Rookie – Appalachian League
2019 Notable Statistics: 3.7 years below league average age
I might jump the gun on Santos a bit by listing him as a tier 2 player in my 2019 midseason rankings but Santos still possesses incredible potential. First off, being 6’9” with impressive athleticism, while only being 18, Santos jumps out whenever you see him. Santos has regressed both in velocity and control, now throwing in the low-90s topping in the mid-90s, and jumping from a career 1.8 BB/9 to 5.5 in 2019. The Mets rushed Santos to the Appalachian League, resulting in terrible results across the board. Nevertheless, Santos has a feel for his three pitches (fastball, slider, changeup), and is in the hands of a great pitching developmental system. With his youth, athleticism, and elevated pitching plane, Santos has ace upside, although at 18 is understandably years away from it.

12. Shervyen Newton, SS/2B/3B
Age: 20
2019 Highest Level: A
2019 Notable Statistics: 32.9 K% – 300’ flyball distance (higher in previous years)
Newton understandably had a down year, as he was rushed to A ball in a pitcher-friendly league. However, with a 6’4” 180 pound frame, combined with an average flyball distance over 300 for the past three years, Newton has potential plus power. As expected with a tall, lanky prospect, his hit tool and subsequent K rates are underdeveloped (32.9 K%). Newton’s upside is substantial, given he grows into an adequate hit tool, plus power, and sticking on the left side of the infield.

13. Kevin Smith, LHP
Age: 22
2019 Highest Level: AA
2019 Notable Statistics: 2.72 xFIP – 29.1 K% – 6.8% BB% in A+
A 7th-round pick in the 2018 draft, Smith raised his stock substantially, making AA by dominating A- and A+ ball. Smith throws with above-average spin rates, causing his low-90s fastball to range around average. His slider and changeup range around the same, giving him a decent three-pitch mix. Smith’s intangibles drive his stock and projection to that of a back-end starter. Smith’s absence from the team’s 40-man roster is likely the main hindrance from Smith throwing big league innings later this season.

14. Freddy Valdez, OF
Age: 18
2019 Highest Level: GCL
2019 Notable Statistics: 18.1 K% – 11.4 BB% (Across GCL and DSL1)
A highly-ranked international signing ($1.45 million bonus), Valdez is a classic power corner outfield / 1B prospect. At 6’3” 212 pounds, Valdez already has a big body and possesses good power for a teenager. Valdez has shown a better plate approach than expected (18.1 K% – 11.4 BB%). With a potential average hit tool and above-average power, Valdez projects as a standard power corner outfielder.

15. Franklyn Kilome, RHP
Age: 24
2019 Highest Level: AA (2018)
2019 Notable Statistics: N/A – DNP
Kilome spent the entire 2018 season rehabbing from a tragic TJ surgery mere months into his Mets tenure. At his best, Kilome three pitches range from above-average to average fastball, curveball, and changeup. Kilome throws in the mid-90s but can struggle with his command at times. He could transition to relief given his age, status on the 40-man roster, and injury history. Either way, he could be a top relief arm or a mid-rotation arm if things break right for him.


Tier 4

16. Jordan Humphreys, RHP
Age: 23
2019 Highest Level: GCL
2019 Notable Statistics: 1 IP
Between his selection in the 18th round in the 2015 draft to 2017, Humphreys found success as a strike-thrower. He pounds the zone, resulting in a career 1.6 BB/9 and 9.4 K/9. Since that 2017 season, Humphreys has thrown one inning due to TJ surgery. While it is hard to know his status now, the Mets showed confidence in him by protecting him in the Rule 5 Draft, showing that they thought other teams could have an interest in keeping him on their active roster all season. Humphreys had success in a quick 11.2 IP sample during the AFL, throwing to a 0.77 ERA. Humphreys has back-end of rotation potential but could be pushed to relief given his status on the 40-man roster.

17. Adrian Hernandez, OF
Age: 18
2019 Highest Level: GCL
2019 Notable Statistics: N/A
Another big international signee ($1.5 million in 2017), Hernandez is a big bag of tools. Hernandez has above-average bat speed, raw power, and speed. With average arm and speed, Hernandez could stick in center field. However, a leg injury kept him out all 2019 raises serious doubts into his future. With a player this young and his status so reliant on tools, this injury could zap him of key tools such as bat speed, raw power, and speed. Other than his injury, Hernandez must improve his contact ability to make the most of his other tools. If Hernandez can show his tools in-game, he will likely rise up this list midseason. However, if he shows the injury affected his tools, he will fall drastically.

18. Blaine McIntosh, OF
Age: 18
2019 Highest Level: GCL
2019 Notable Statistics: 103 PA (small sample size)
A surprising late-round signing who had a commitment to Vanderbilt, McIntosh has the potential to be among the biggest steals of the past year’s draft. McIntosh is another “toolsy” player, offering premier speed, as well as above-average bat speed. McIntosh has the potential to be a plus defender in center, given his speed and above-average arm. His 6’4” 175 pound frame could help him build power. However, McIntosh is very raw, needing refinements to his contact skills and overall plate approach. If McIntosh can put together a good season, look for him to gain more recognition in national prospect lists.

19. Jaylen Palmer, SS/3B
Age: 19
2019 Highest Level: Rookie – Appalachian League
2019 Notable Statistics: 39.1 K% – 11.2 BB% – 111 wRC+
A local Flushing, NY native, Palmer was taken late in the 2018 MLB draft (22nd round). Palmer is another tall, lanky prospect, with a 6’3” 195 pound frame. Palmer has impressive athleticism which should allow him to stay on the left side of the infield, although likely not at SS as he fills out. Although his contact skills are very raw, he has intriguing power potential.

20. Daison Acosta, RHP
Age: 21
2019 Highest Level: A
2019 Notable Statistics: 24.3 K%, 10.5 BB% (Across 2 Levels)
As a low-pedigree international signee who doesn’t have loud physical tools, Acosta is a smaller name. However, he is highly athletic right hander who has shown an ability to make batters swing and miss. In October, Prospects1500’s Jake Berry told me of an impressive performance Acosta put forth versus rehabbing major leaguers Dansby Swanson and Austin Riley, in which Acosta’s curveball made them look foolish. In addition to his breaking ball, Acosta also throws a changeup and a mid-90s fastball which all should allow him to continue starting.

21. Dedniel Nunez, RHP
Age: 23
2019 Highest Level: A+ St. Lucie
2019 Notable Statistics: 1.91 xFIP at A ball
Another low pedigree international signee, Nunez throws in the mid-90s. Although already 23, Nunez domination at A (1.91 xFIP) and continued strikeout numbers at A+ (24.1 K%) make him worthy of a spot here.

22. Ali Sanchez, C
Age: 23
2019 Highest Level: AAA
2019 Notable Statistics: 17.5 K% between AA and AAA
A lower variance prospect, barring a disaster, Sanchez will play major league innings this season. Sanchez is a plus defender at the most important defensive position, with all the physical tools (arm strength and catching) and intangibles (framing, game calling). This allows his offense to lag much further behind. Offensively, Sanchez shows good contact skills, with a minimal 17.5 K% between AA and AAA. Sanchez lacks on base skills and power. However, with his defense likely giving him ample opportunity at the major league level, Sanchez’s contact skills could give his other tools a chance to play up to a playable rate.

23. Endy Rodriguez, C
Age: 19
2019 Highest Level: GCL
2019 Notable Statistics: 197 wRC+ at DSL1
Rodriguez, is a catcher in a different mold than his J2 mate Francisco Alvarez, in that Rodriguez is built around his athleticism with contact skills, while Alvarez is a stocky power-built body. With his athleticism he has the potential to be a plus defender at the premium defensive position, but also allows for his potential versatility at 1B and the corner outfield. This defensive ability along with his potential above average hit and potentially average power and run tools give him a high ceiling should he reach all those goals.

24. Andres Regnault, C
Age: 21
2019 Highest Level: Rookie – Appalachian League
2019 Notable Statistics: 120 wRC+ at Rookie – Appalachian League
Regnault is an offense over defense catcher currently. His hit and power combination has the potential to be above average. Regnault has a 6’0” 251 pound frame which limits his versatility, likely only allowing him to DH and 1B, other premier offensive positions. Still just 21, Regnault has plenty of time for his defense to catch up to offense as otherwise, the decrease in positional value would make him much less appealing.

25. Robert Dominguez, RHP
Age: 18
2019 Highest Level: N/A
2019 Notable Statistics: N/A
A 2019 International signee, Dominguez is the same age as players being drafted out of high school and already has hit 99 in camps. Dominguez has feel for a curveball and changeup which would let him continue as a starter. However, Dominguez offers a ceiling among the best in his class. Although the bust risk is as high as it gets, Dominguez’s potential with top tier velocity gives him validation on this list. If Dominguez surprises with his other tools look for him to skyrocket up this list.

26. Luis Carpio, 2B/SS
Age: 22
2019 Highest Level: AA
2019 Stats: 16.8 K% – 9.9 BB%
Carpio is one of the few players in the upper minors who have a chance to provide an impact in the majors. As a second baseman, his only real deficiency is his power. He shows signs of his advanced plate approach, with a minimal 16.8 K% and high 9.9 BB%. Carpio provides a decent glove at second, with him being able to backup at shortstop. This defensive ability coupled with the lack of options in the upper minors should provide Carpio a shot in the majors for his hit tool to play.

27. Federico Polanco, SS/2B/3B
Age: 18
2019 Highest Level: GCL
2019 Notable Statistics: 12.4 K% – 12.4 BB% at DSL1
A DSL all-star with a 146 wRC+ in 186 PA, Polanco likely profiles as a second baseman long term. At 5’10” 155 pounds, and with a swing without much power projection, Polanco must continue to be carried by his potential plus hit tool.

28. Ryley Gilliam, RHP
Age: 23
2019 Highest Level: AAA
2019 Notable Statistics: 21.8 K% – 16.4 BB% – 21.4% HR/FB
Widely projected to be one of the first players from his draft class to reach the majors, Gilliam flew through the minors in 2018. Dominating A+ (1.72 xFIP) and AA (2.25 xFIP), Gilliam finally reached trouble with AAA and their incredibly hitter friendly league. Gilliam lost his control in AAA, raising his BB% from 4.8 in A+ to 9.1 in AA to 16.4 in AAA. Additionally, Gilliam was killed by the new balls, with a 21.4% HR/FB. Gilliam throws an above average fastball and curveball. Look for Gilliam to crack the majors this year with the potential to be a late inning reliever.


Tier 5

29. Cesar Loaiza, LHP
Age: 21
2019 Highest Level: Rookie – Appalachian League
2019 Notable Statistics: 5.71 ERA – 5.45 xFIP
A down year for Loaiza has his drop to tier 5. His strikeout and ground ball numbers all declined (9 K/9 – 38.8% groundball percentage). Because of the small sample size (41IP), his size and stature (6’3” left-handed pitcher), and previous success in strikeout rates and ground ball percentage keep him ranked.

30. Jefferson Escorcha, LHP
Age: 20
2019 Highest Level: Rookie – Appalachian League
2019 Notable Statistics: 2.38 ERA – 3.95 xFIP – 4.7 BB%
Escorcha has succeeded by limiting walks and hard contact. A lefty with good results in rookie ball is intriguing to follow into more advanced levels.

31. Michel Otanez, RHP
Age: 22
2019 Highest Level: A- NYPL
2019 Notable Statistics: 10 K/9 combined between Rookie- Appalachian League and A- NYPL
Otanez is a big 6’3” 215 pound pitcher who has posted good strikeout numbers. If Otanez continues growth in his curveball, his fastball – curveball pairing could be above average.

32. Jordany Ventura, RHP
Age: 19
2019 Highest Level: Rookie – Appalachian League
2019 Notable Statistics: 52.1 IP – 9.3 K/9 across DSL1, GCL, and Appalachian League
Ventura is a smaller 6’ 162 pound pitcher who relies more on his athleticism than his stuff. Ventura has the makings of three pitches which could all become above average in his fastball, slider, and changeup. Ventura

33. Tony Dibrell, RHP
Age: 24
2019 Highest Level: AA
2019 Notable Statistics: 20.1 K% – 4.47 ERA across A+ and AA
Dibrell throws four pitches around average, (fastball, slider, curveball, and changeup), with the changeup being the best. Due to his advanced age, lack of elite tools, and mediocre results in his minor league career, Dibrell largely projects as a depth starter.

34. Jace Beck, RHP
Age: 19
2019 Highest Level: GCL
2019 Notable Statistics: 8 IP – 10K – 1BB
Beck was a 22nd round pick in the 2019 MLB draft who signed for the maximum amount of $125K without penalties. Beck’s potential largely stems from his 6’9” 200 pound frame. Beck throws in the low 90s which is accompanied by a curveball and changeup.

35. Franklin Parra, LHP
Age: 20
2019 Highest Level: GCL
2019 Notable Statistics: 33 K% – 2.57 ERA – 3.82 xFIP
Parra is a lefty chosen in the 11th round in the 2018 MLB Draft. Between being signed for a 150K bonus and taken in the first round without penalties for not signing a player, Parra is aplayer the Mets clearly valued. Thus far in his career, Parra has posted good strikeout numbers, which along with his low 90s velocity and makings of a curveball, slider, and changeup, which should allow him to remain a starter.

36. Hayden Senger, C
Age: 22
2019 Highest Level: A
2019 Notable Statistics: 100 wRC+ – 18.1 K% – 7.1 BB%
Senger was drafted late in the 2018 draft (24th round) as a defensive catcher, and has lived up to that reputation. Senger has surprised however with his bat, as he has showed some contact skills, with a level swing.

37. Raul Beracierta, OF
Age: 20
2019 Highest Level: A- Brooklyn
2019 Notable Statistics: 103 PA – .562 OPS
Beracierta had struggled in limited time between the GCL and A-. Nevertheless, Beracierta is still young, with strong raw tools. Beracierta has shown a good plate approach in the past, and should play good defense in either outfield corner spots. His all fields approach, with good strikeout and walk numbers in the past show his ceiling.

38. William Lugo, SS/3B
Age: 18
2019 Highest Level: GCL
2019 Notable Statistics: .499 OPS – 2.5 years younger than league average
At 6’3” 215 pounds, Lugo is likely corner defender in the future (LF, RF, 3B, 1B). Lugo offers potential above average power and has showed a good plate approach before being aggressively sent to GCL.

39. Desmond Lindsay, OF
Age: 23
2019 Highest Level: A+ St. Lucie
2019 Notable Statistics: 59 PA – 86 wRC+
The Mets highest pick in the 2015 MLB Draft, Lindsay has long intrigued with his tools. Lindsay has the potential of above average power and speed while playing center field. He tore his hamstring and missed almost all of 2019, the latest of multiple injuries for Lindsay. Between the injuries and his poor hit tool, Lindsay has not been able to translate his tools to on field success.

40. Carlos Cortes, 2B/LF
Age: 22
2019 Highest Level: A+ St. Lucie
2019 Notable Statistics: .255/.336/.397 – 14.6 K% – 9.9 BB% – 295.4 FB Distance – 119 wRC+
Cortes has always seemed like he will overachieve in the majors to me. A player who is limited to playing minimally valuable defensive positions and also does not have any standout tools, Cortes survives because of his overall offensive approach. Cortes hardly strikes out (14.6 K%) and has above average power. Having drafted him three times, most recently in the third round in 2018 MLB Draft, clearly the Mets like Cortes and feel like his offense will carry his profile regardless of the negligible defensive value. With Cortes leaving the pitcher friendly Florida State League, look for his offensive stats to improve noticeably.

41. Fernando Villalobos, C
Age: 17
2019 Highest Level: DSL1
2019 Notable Statistics: .195/.382/.232 – 110 PA between DSL1 and DSL2
A high profile international signing, (#34 on baseball america top international prospects in 2018), Villalobos offers great athleticism at catcher. His offense is raw but he has shown a relatively flat swing with below average power. As an athletic player with limited experience, Villalobos offers intriguing upside.

42. Jake Mangum, OF
Age: 23
2019 Highest Level: A- Brooklyn
2019 Notable Statistics: .247/.337/.297 – 17SB – 210 PA
A poor debut for the former college star did little to impact his stock. Mangum is a low variance prospect who should make the majors as a backup outfielder / pinch runner.

43. Tylor Megill, RHP
Age: 24
2019 Highest Level: AA
2019 Notable Statistics: 30.5 K% – 8.3 BB% – 71.2 IP
Taken in the 8th round in the 2018 MLB Draft, Megill was a collegiate reliever with mediocre results. However, the Mets were intrigued by his 6’7” 230 pound frame. This frame leads to his ability to go multiple innings, which with his advanced spin rates combine to an intriguing prospect. Since joining the Mets, Megill has posted excellent strikeout numbers. Megill should get a look at major league innings this season.

44. Bryce Hutchinson, RHP
Age: 21
2019 Highest Level: A
2019 Notable Statistics: 91.2 IP – 7.4 BB%
Another big bodied pitcher (6’6” 245 pound), Hutchinson was taken in the 12th round of the 2017 MLB Draft. 2019 was Hutchinson’s first full season with 91.2 IP. Hutchinson succeed largely due to his ability to limit walks (7.4 BB%).

45. Stanley Consuegra, OF
Age: 19
2019 Highest Level: N/A
2019 Stats: N/A
Between his lanky frame (6’2” 167 pounds), decent feel for contact, and average speed, Consuegra has immense upside. However, Consuegra missed all of last season due to an ACL. If Consuegra is able to return healthy and show his tools, it will rebuild his prospect stock.

46. Patrick Mazeika, C/1B
Age: 26
2019 Highest Level: AA
2019 Notable Statistics: .245/.312/.426 – 116 wRC+
For the past two seasons, Mazeika has roughly split time at C and 1B. If Mazeika was able to play an average catcher, he would be in the top 15 of this list. Alternately, if he was a full-time 1B, he would be left out on this list. Mazeika is the rare high variance, upper minors prospect.

47. Junior Tilien, SS/IF/OF
Age: 17
2019 Highest Level: N/A
2019 Notable Statistics: N/A
Tilien is a recent 2019 international free agent signee who has yet to play in an affiliated game. He is known for an advanced approach and swing. Defensively, Tilien has the versatility to play all over the infield and outfield, due to his above average arm strength and average speed. Things to look forward to with Tilien are where the Mets decide to play him defensively and how his raw power develops.

48. Joshua Cornielly, RHP
Age: 19
2019 Highest Level: GCL
2019 Notable Statistics: 10.2 K/9 – 1.8 BB/9
A favorite of mine from when he became a star pitcher in my OOTP, Cornielly has mid-rotation upside in real life. Cornielly is a highly athletic pitcher with good command thus far in his career.

49. Warren Saunders, 3B/1B/2B
Age: 21
2019 Highest Level: GCL
2019 Notable Statistics: 131 wRC+ – 15.6 K% – 6.8 BB%
Saunders signed with Mets prior to the 2019 season. In his first season, Saunders showed a good plate approach (15.6 K% – 6.8 BB%). With his bigger 6’3” 188 pound frame, the expectation is Saunders will hit for power. Look for him to raise his stock this season if he can perform at a more age appropriate level.

50. Luke Ritter, 2B/UT
Age: 22
2019 Highest Level: A-
2019 Notable Statistics: 122 wRC+ – 18.4 K% – 12.1 BB%
While only playing 2B thus far with the Mets, Ritter has shown he can play all around the field. While Ritter has minimal power, he offers an advanced plate approach. Ritters versatility defensively, average speed, and good plate discipline offer him the chance to make the majors as a utilityman.




About Christian Kainer 5 Articles
Christian Kainer covers the New York Mets minor league system for Prospects1500. Christian is a native Mets fan living in New Jersey, and going to school the University of Notre Dame in South Bend, Indiana. Christian was introduced to sports by his brother and dad, but fell in love with baseball as he learned how much math is involved in every play. Follow him on twitter at @CJ_Kainer.

2 Comments

    • While HOF is definitely way too far ahead to think about, Mauricio is the only “realistic” option to become a HOFer. If he can become a 30~40 home run player with good contact and defensive skills I can possibly see him as a HOFer. The only other options I see are Alvarez, Ramirez, and Dominguez just because of their explosive raw tools at such a young age. There is some (slim) chance they capitalize on all that and become HOF worthy.

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